Workshops

 

WORKSHOP BLOCK 1

Delegates will choose one of the following:

 

BEATS & RHYTHMN: THE SOUND OF RESISTANCE

WITH: Jean Assamoa

The heartline of our people! From Indigenous to Diasporic communities, the drum is a powerful symbol of resistance, survival, and strength Just as a heart pulses, the sound of a drum is a constant force in our collective histories. This workshop will focus on re-connecting to this form of communication, entertainment, and spiritual awakening

 

INTERNALIZATION OF VIOLENCE: SHADEISM, RESPECTABILITY POLITICS, AND THE DISCOURSE OF ‘BLACK ON BLACK HATE’

Presenter: Akua Benjamin & Luam Kidane

It’s often easier to talk about interracial violence then it is then to talk about violence from one’s own community. The manifestation of this violence is colloquially and jokingly refereed to as black-on-black crime, but represents the deep internalization of the very trauma that we are victims and survivors of. From shadeism, to the discourse of respectability politics, to the reniggerization of our black youth, this workshop will deconstruct and challenge our own communities baggage and strategize on ways of building more solidarity within our diverse communities.

 

NO JUSTICE, NO PEACE: A POST-TRAYVON REFLECTIVE

Presenter: Roger Love of the African Canadian Legal Clinic

Recovering from the news of this past summer is not an easy thing. The national discourse around blackness, identity, race, and the still-present effects of colonialism is diverse, complex, and unanswered. This workshop will look at the role that the law and public policy in black lives, the legacy of verdicts like the Zimmerman, and strategize ways that our communities can seek justice.

 

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WORKSHOP BLOCK 2

Delegates will choose one of the following:

 

MINDFULLNESS VS MIND FULLNESS: MEDITATION, YOGA, & SELF ACTUALIZATION

Presenter: Tuku

Part of reconciling with our identities is to stop, reflect and engage in individual and communal self-care. Black bodies are sites of trauma, and part of self-preservation is having the skills to check in with one’s body, mind and spirit. This workshop aims to slow things down and engage participants in an inclusive, body-positive yoga class.

 

FROM SPIRITS TO CHURCHES: BLACK SPIRITUALITY DECONSTRUCTED

Presenter: Archibishop Dr. Deloris Severight

From Christianity to Islam to Voodoo and others, the manifestations of religion and spirituality has strong implication in our identities in ourselves and each other. This workshop will look critically at the positive and negative roles that religion and spirituality has historically played in black communities. As well as reflect on the ways of reclaiming our ancestral spiritual traditions.

 

50 SHADES OF BLACK: IS INTERSECTIONALITY STILL RELEVANT?

Presenter: Gilary Massa

Black people aren’t just black people. We hold various other identities and lives, many of which are often neglected. When discussing marginality, the experiences of women, queer, trans, disabled, indigenous, young, migrant, non-status, poor, unemployed, are often neglected. The experiences of black folks are not all equal and this workshop will explore the ways oppression can be disproportionately compounded, manifested and multiplied.

 

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WORKSHOP BLOCK 3

Delegates will choose one of the following:

 

ORALITY: STORY TELLING FROM THE MARGINS

Presenter: The MAD Poet

Story-telling is one of the most ancient forms of documenting the human experience. A cornerstone in Pan-African and Caribbean cultures, this skill allows communities and individuals to address, archive, and heal from the complexities of daily existence. Mad Poet will work with participants to find their voice within spoken word, poetry-writing, and other forms of storytelling.

 

CULTURAL ADORATION OR THEFT? THE COMMERCIALISATION & APPROPRIATION OF BLACK CULTURE

Presenter: Janay Khan

From popular music, to fashion, to foods, everyone seems to love black people. Better yet, everyone seems to love the things that black people produce and create. From the Cyrus-led obsession with twerking, to ‘urban wear’, to the continued reliance on black face in entertainment, the appropriation of black culture fuels industries. Our cultures are taken, misrepresented, and sold back to us. What does consensual cultural exchange look like and is it even possible in a society where power structure already determine who has access to one’s culture, body, and history?

 

DECOLONIZING OUR COMMUNITIES: SOLIDARITY & INDEGENIETY

Presenter:  Ajamu Nanguaya and Logik

In our discussions of finding our collective identity, how can we weave in discussions on decolonization as part of that process? What are the pros and cons of building and fostering pan-Africanism and Black Nationalism? As members of the diaspora, our healing must include solidarity and de-colonizing our settler footprint on this land. This workshop will also explore the different ways that black settler solidarity can look like to Aboriginal folks, and challenge participants to reimagine what a global de-colonization movement can look like.